France lifts restrictions on D-Day video coverage

June 4, 2014
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U.S. WW II veteran 89 year old Arden C. Earll, from Erie Pensylvania, who landed on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944 with the 29th infantry division regiment, is applauded as he arrives at a ceremony in honor of the division, in La Cambe, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Wednesday June 4, 2014. World leaders and veterans are preparing to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
U.S. WW II veteran 89 year old Arden C. Earll, from Erie Pensylvania, who landed on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944 with the 29th infantry division regiment, is applauded as he arrives at a ceremony in honor of the division, in La Cambe, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Wednesday June 4, 2014. World leaders and veterans are preparing to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
PARIS (AP) — France on Wednesday dropped restrictions on live video coverage of ceremonies this week marking the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy, ensuring that millions of viewers across the world will be able to watch the event as it unfolds.

The French president's office and two French broadcasters had earlier refused to let news agencies and online news providers distribute the live broadcast free of charge, prompting protests from international news organizations. News agencies including The Associated Press, Reuters and Agence France-Presse, and ENEX, a news exchange for European commercial broadcasters, requested open access to the broadcast for their 1,500 subscribers around the world.

Host broadcasters France Televisions and TF1 this time offered news agencies unfettered access to live coverage Friday of the main international ceremony, where President Barack Obama, Queen Elizabeth II and other world leaders will join aging veterans to honor those who fought to liberate Normandy from Nazi occupation.

"Because of the exceptional character of the event and at the request of the president's office, the signal will be available for free," the broadcasters' note read.

French President Francois Hollande's office had granted the exclusive rights to those two broadcasters to broadcast the main international ceremony at Ouistreham on the Normandy coast. The networks had initially imposed sports-style syndication fees on the event. In other countries, host broadcasters usually offer free access to TV signals at events of global significance, or levy small technical charges. The sums demanded in France far exceeded such charges.

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