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AP reports on furtive lives of US residents still in Afghanistan

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021 file photo, A Taliban fighter checks the trunk of a car at a checkpoint in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sept. 16, 2021. Some of the U.S. residents left behind after the U.S. military’s chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan describe hiding out to avoid detection by the Taliban. And they are concerned that the Biden administration’s promised efforts to get them out have stalled. (AP Photo / Felipe Dana, File)

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Investigative reporter Bernard Condon and San Diego-based reporter Julie Watson kept following a story much of the media has moved on from: what day-to-day life is like for American resident green-card holders who were left behind after the U.S. military’s chaotic exit from Afghanistan.

The pair’s story, based on text messages, emails and phone conversations from those still in Afghanistan to loved ones and rescue groups, and directly with the AP, described a fearful, furtive existence of hiding in houses for weeks, keeping the lights off at night, moving from place to place, and donning baggy clothing and burqas to avoid detection by the Taliban if they absolutely must venture out.

All say they were scared the Taliban would find them,throw them in jail,perhaps even kill them because they are Americans or had worked for the U.S. government. And they are concerned that the Biden administration’s promised efforts to get them out have stalled.

Condon and Watson had to walk a fine line,telling individuals’ stories without identifying details that would open them to potential retaliation. The ambitious story,accompanied by photos provided by one family of green card holders from California, was part of an important body of AP work over the past week that remained focused on Afghanistan in the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal.

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