Best of the Week

Latest

AP: Breaches of voting software raise election security concerns

FILE- In this Sept. 16, 2019 file photo, Scott Tucker demonstrates the Dominion Voting system Georgia will use in Atlanta. Republican efforts to question the results of the 2020 election have led to two significant breaches of voting software that have alarmed election security experts who say they have increased the risk to elections in jurisdictions that use the equipment. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

AP_21239744397626_hm-dominion-1.jpg

AP Atlanta-based State Government Team reporter Christina Cassidy broke the news that copies of confidential software for a widely used voting machine had been released publicly during an event held by supporters of former President Donald Trump, leading to wider concerns about election security.

After a local elections clerk in Colorado leaked confidential information about her county’s voting machines, Cassidy began calling her sources to get a sense of what the breach could mean for other states that used the same voting machines produced by Dominion Voting Systems. Her source reporting uncovered yet another leak, this time in a county in Michigan where Trump allies had challenged his election loss. The software copies ended up being distributed publicly at a symposium hosted by the CEO of MyPillow, Mike Lindell, a major Trump supporter who has helped spread his lies of election fraud.

The software leak from Antrim County, Michigan, had not previously been reported until Cassidy learned of it. Election security experts said taken together, the leaked software copies could provide hackers with a “practice environment” to probe for vulnerabilities in Dominion machines, which are used in 30 states.

AP 2124047490737hm dominion i
A worker passes a Dominion Voting Systems ballot scanner while setting up a polling location at an elementary school in Gwinnett County, Ga., outside of Atlanta, Jan. 4, 2021. – AP Photo / Ben Gray
Contact us