Statement from AP on our North Korea bureau

Dec. 24, 2014
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In the late 1990s, Nate Thayer, a former AP stringer, became disgruntled over a distribution agreement with AP covering video he had shot in Cambodia. More recently, he dismissed the value of AP’s North Korea bureau shortly before he sought from AP detailed proprietary information about the bureau for further articles that were published on Dec. 24 by

No serious news organization would hand over the kind of business agreements, salary information and other payment documentation that Mr. Thayer sought. His latest articles from Dec. 24 are full of errors, inaccuracies and baseless innuendo. The "draft agreement" between AP and North Korea's KCNA news agency that he cites is remote from the final document. Among other inaccuracies, AP does not distribute outright KCNA stories, as Mr. Thayer concludes, but at times AP cites KCNA reports, as do most other news organizations, including his publisher. Because of his reliance on this "draft agreement," he makes the laughable assertion that AP's Pyongyang bureau submits to censorship by the North Korean government.

It is unlikely that Mr. Thayer spoke to as many AP sources as he claims. Indeed, Chad O'Carroll, the editor of, told an AP news leader several days ago that he would not publish Mr. Thayer's latest attack against AP after all. It is regrettable that the website decided to reverse course on Dec. 24 because of a newly found "draft agreement."

To Mr. O'Carroll, we had provided this statement last month:

"We recognize the unique challenges in reporting from North Korea. We are proud of our work in all formats and will continue to provide robust coverage going forward that will widen still further the world’s view of this little-known state.

"Regarding AP interviews with the three American prisoners and coverage of court proceedings: In accordance with normal practice, AP editorial decisions were made about the news value of very similar material available from three different interviews in short order from a captive individual. When we felt the material was newsworthy, we filed stories; when we felt it offered nothing new, we passed.

"Journalistically, our local staffers in Pyongyang are supervised and in regular contact with their supervisors. We rely on our international staff for our journalism and the local employees do not ever file or transmit stories on their own, independent of supervision. AP work is not submitted for any kind of review by North Korean authorities.

"AP does not submit to censorship. We do not run stories by KCNA or any government official before we publish them. At the same time, officials are free to grant or deny access or interviews."

Paul Colford
Director of AP Media Relations

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